Slavoj Žižek: In Defense of Lost Causes

(2096 words)

Constant revolutionizing of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social relations, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned, and man is at last compelled to face with sober senses his real conditions of life, and his relations with his kind. [....] In place of the old local and national seclusion and self-sufficiency, we have intercourse in every direction, universal inter-dependence of nations. And as in material, so also in …

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Citation:
Wood, Kelsey. "In Defense of Lost Causes". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 07 February 2013
[http://litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=24951, accessed 17 April 2014.]